Influencing the Subconscious: Part One

Influencing the Subconscious: Part One

 

Free verse and free form.

 

I like to use the simplistic definition for free verse as poetry that follows a pattern similar to natural speech rather than depending on traditional rhyme, meter, and repetitive stanza patterns.  In natural speech an individual will use variations in vocal inflection and speed of delivery.  Free verse poetry accomplishes inflection and speed through line length, punctuation, line segmentation, word choice.  While free verse can employ a rhyme scheme, that scheme may change per stanza.  Free form poetry is free verse that moves further into the ‘abstract’ by breaking the bounds of formatting to accentuate the visual as the driver of rhythm.  My favorite example of extreme ‘abstract’ is EE Cummings’  “kitty’. sixteen, 5’1″,white,prostitute;”

 

An example of my free verse:

 

March (Poems of Winter: 2004)

 

March drags the days along

a slow progression

winter’s echo near

spring’s minuet playing out its contradictions

counting, marking time

a cool reception to ensuing warmth

 

Counting the minutes, counting the days

wisping the seconds away

lasting for the moment, shadows of doubt

fleeting so fleeting

winter’s last pout

 

 

An example of my free form

 

i dream

 

as night wraps itself around me like a kiss

i dream

sometimes of you

sometimes

       not

no control have i

as the dreams flash of

visions past

or visions

              yet to be cast

as night wraps itself around me like a kiss

i dream

sometimes of you

       sometimes

                not

3 thoughts on “Influencing the Subconscious: Part One

  1. I sure must have missed that one, in my e e cummings travels–they didn’t teach it in my school, anyway–though there were others. God bless you BIG–love, sis Caddo

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